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they captured a u.s. drone and issues a warning "we shall trample on the united states." >>> drunk and partying the night before he shocked the nfl and fans. >>> director kathryn bigelow talks about the controversy over her bin laden death movie. >> i think it's nice because now the film can speak for itself and i certainly have a feeling that a lot of those debates will transition to something slightly less controversial. >> the full interview straight ahead. >>> so you don't read runway ? >> no. >> before today you never heard of me. >> no. >> you have no style or sense of fashion. >> i think that depends on what your -- >> no, no, that wasn't a question. >> the devil's diplomacy. vogue editor anna wintour, u.s. ambassador? maybe. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. this morning iran is bragging. it claims it capture d an american drone. the u.s. is denying it. iran has made that drone a star on state tv. according to iran's state-run news agency, the drone was captured immediately after entering iranian air space. the drone, now being sh
to go to brazil six months ago, if you told me the u.s. had just run faster, -- grown faster, 2.7%, we're expecting the u.s. economy to grow to%. the reason i raise this is to go down there and talk to policy makers and business people. we could have more taxes here, more regulation there. a little more cost of labor here. and a fair amount of uncertainty and take on one of the great economic miracles. they understand this thing they have a great economy growing rapidly is fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than later uncertainty. that is almost like a test tube of forcing. we had a time in which we had a huge amount of uncertainty. comes from -- some comes from government action. we had an aggressive regulatory agenda. we have not made a certain investments we have made. you add that up and you have a period in which businesses are operating under huge weight. creates the conditions under which businesses can operate in intellectual freedom. among the things government can do is create the conditions under which cost [no audio] to allow businesses to innovate. >> one
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
today, so thank you. [applause] >> later today you can see a discussion on how u.s. debt slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to a new phase of political and economic development. event is hosted by the american enterprise institute in washington. you can see it live, 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. just the channel to the ability find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that a don't think you could have ever imagined. if you come to me and say mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or the show with the duck guy, or certain food channel network, i don't think that if i had to predetermined that was my practicum i would've ever picked that. but the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i
in the state so you could get the common ballot. president, u.s. senate, state questiones. we got the word on that out as best we could. e-mail voting, for military and overseas voting. we expanded that to allow people in other states, pennsylvania, new york, we were getting hundreds of phone calls, i can't get home. to late for me to get a paper-absentee ballot. what can i do? the quote that hit home the most was, i lost my house, please don't let me lose my right to vote. i mean, that really hit home with us so we did whatever we could to get these people the ability to vote. >> you messenger e-mail. how did that work out? overall good? >> in general -- we're still doing the analysis of how, but at the time, again, being the situation that we're in, that was a tool that we used maybe wouldn't in a normal situation ball it was something that if we didn't do that, there would be hundreds or thousands of people that would not have been able to vote that day. >> do you think it's something you would consider more institutional going forward? >> i'm not going to comment on that. [laughter] >>
's not just a u.s. story it's kind after north american story. >> paul: right. >> a ton of oil in canada, there's lots of the same geological formations in mexico, and so, you know, there's a lot of energy that can come up and, for example, the ceo of fluor, the largest construction company says there's at least 30 billion dollars of potential projects just around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> paul: people are talking now and even by 2020 which isn't that far away we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil, gas, we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger energy? not just for the energy economy, but for things like manufacturing and consumer prices? >> well, certainly, you know, obviously, residential heating, things like that would be more affordable and make us more competitive in manufacturing, but there's another angle that's also very interesting and that has to do with exports. we could actually become the lead are producer of energy for the emerging markets. energy demand in this country is going down, but in the rest of the world it'
according to what is institutionally appropriate. the u.s., there will be a friend of syrian meeting. reports are is that the u.s. is preparing to recognize transitional governments if one were out of this new revolutionary coalition. if there is a transitional government that is recognized, what will the relationship be to these councils that are more ad hoc? are these local? council local do they have to be -- are these local council sustainable? do they have to be accountable for the structures that may emerge? what is the sustainability in the future of these councils? >> they can build their relations. people have to survive. during my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be
-election, and this report -- again, out of the associated press -- is that a u.s. official involved in the case, that's how they describe their source, a u.s. official involved in the case told the associated press that homeland security specifically told the cops not to arrest the guy until after election day. would there be any reason not to do that? >> it's a pretty appalling accusation. if that were, in fact, true, that's a very serious accusation to say that the obama administration in the form of the department of homeland security would have shielded an incumbent democrat running for re-election against a well-funded republican challenger, that they would have seemedded him from this embarrassment in the weeks before the election would be a very serious charge, very serious, indeed. megyn: they come out and say that is categorically false. a homeland security spokesman says it is categorically false that we delayed the arrest of this guy, luis abraham sanchez zavaletta until after the election. so we have two diametrically opposed stories. one is on the record, one is off. where does that leave us?
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
. and that's not just a u.s. story. it is a north american story. there was a ton of oil in canada. there is the same geological formations in mexico. there is a lot of energy that can come upe'. the ceo of flor says there is at least $30 billion of potential c projects around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> u people say by 2020 we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil and the gas we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger economy? things like manufacturing and consumer prices? >> certainly obviously residential heating and things like that would be more affordable and make us more competitive and manufacturing and that has to do with exports. we could actually become the leading producer energy for the emerging markets. energy demand in this country is going down, but in the rest of thegy world it is going up. this would be any senator muss -- ant' enormous source of jobs and tax revenue. >> and the big threat to this is politics. if somehow regulators get in there and say for whatever reason we are going to stop this shale gas revol
" launched its own e-book called u.s.a. tomorrow. a publisher that any stripe can come to market very early in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years fro
for toyota. now facing a record fine by the u.s. government. the automaker was ordered to pay $17.4 million for delaying a recall and for being slow to report problems to federal regulators. this is the fourth fine against toyota in the last two years. analysts point out, though, this fine is a small fraction of the automaker's earnings. >>> and talk about instant outrage. instagram, which allows you to dramatically enhance digital photos, ignited a social media rebellion when it seemed to suggest plans to start selling your pictures next month. thousands of angry users deleted their accounts. in response, instagram announced it will not sell your photos after all. so everyone, continue posting those pictures of your food. >> and all the daily minutia of your life that only you care about. >> it's interesting, because they say, well, people misunderstood the policy. by i've got to tell you, most times those policies are reviewed by hordes of attorneys and it's usually not misunderstood or misinterpreted. i wonder if it was that social media rebellion that woke people up. that shows you the
in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome dean alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on the book, i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. nobody has come after me out. you should've read the draft that i wrote. [laughter] second, i am one of the few who practices regularly before the supreme court that did not file for the fisher v. university of texas case. [laughter] let's remember that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and on about affirmative action. the question is university of texas, did it violate the equal protection clause in connection with the undergraduate admissions program, ended abigail fisher, which he injured by what the university of texas did. i would like to start by explaining a little bit more than you would get about the admissions program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does and does not do. we have the top 10% of his guaranteeing anyone who graduates in the top 10% from their high school class
present within families than other groups in u.s. society, sow how can it approach immigrants rather than immigration policy may be decisive. there was a great commentary, a republican analyst who said, the republican party did really well on latino leaders but not on latino followers, and if you look at it in fact the two governors were latino in this country are both republican. who of the three senators who are latino are republicans. republicans have not down so badly on recruiting latino politicians. we could not have said ten years ago -- democrats were on their ware but the republicans have caught up. and it's catching up relative the support they have gotten from the latino electorate. so is there a difference between latino leaders and supporters. does this look forward the fact that the republican party is getting ahead of the game and will do better in the future, othe fact the republicans have made inroads and still unable to attract latino votes and the converse for democrats. can the feel it's a strong base of latino voters or should democrats be worried that in the long ter
back to mortga"morn joe." there are new developments involving the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. it places most of the blame on the state department for providing extra security. they conclude a systemic management failure at the state department resulted in grossly inadequate security at the consulate where four americans were killed that night. the report says the u.s. relied on poorly skilled local militia members to safeguard the facility, and investigators found no evidence it was sparked by protests to an anti-muslim video. >> no evidence of that, and that's what, of course, the white house and the press led with after this happened. >> this is from an independent panel. >> unbelievable. gross negligence, willie, against hillary clinton's state democrat department. >> the report found no cause for disciplinary action. they made 29 recommendations to improve embassy security. secretary of state hillary clinton reportedly has accepted all of them. >> can i ask you, when is the hearing? >> thursday. >> what is she going to say at the hearing. >> she's not going to
. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daugh
like. you're going to see the u.s. senate become stronger because of the results of tim scott, not because of what he looks like. so this is not -- that's why i said he earned this spot. i understand that we made history today and i am proud that we made history today. i also believe in the people of south carolina and the people of this country. as the daughter of indian immigrants that saw early on that you can be anything you want to be and nothing can get in your way, i want to remind everybody that is not the messenger, it will always be the message. tim scott has the right message. >> [inaudible] >> from my perspective, if you get the message right and you market it well, people listen. america is still a center right nation. the fact is that the better we get at marketing our message, the more it will resonate. i think fresh faces and authenticity goes a long way in the political process. you don't have to save the best, but you have to go there. we'll go to new places and new territories and new lands in many ways. this message of conservatism will reach the ends of th
with the spending problem when this recession started, and all of the u.s. department of transportation, there was one federal bureaucrat that made over $175,000 a year. 18 months later, there was 1690 bureaucrats making above $170,000 a year. that is just not sustainable. right now today in the u.s. department of education, average salary across the board in the federal department of education, the average salary is $102,000 a year. isaverage teacher's salary $42,000 the year, less than half of what federal bureaucrats are making. most of them have never talked a child to read. we need to leave those dollars in the hands of the states and the people and let the teachers be able to teach. i have been very critical of president bush with notes have left behind -- no child left behind. i hear teachers all over the country i have talked to and they all agree with me we need to get rid of no child left behind. we need to leave those dollars in the hands of the states and the people, and that is one area of spending where we could do so. students would be in a whole lot better situation. the
in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited
with this kind of obstructionism is the u.s. senate? >> well, it's a challenge. and i think that, you know, one of the things that my uncle ted kennedy was so great at is bringing people together. and trying to create personal relationships, which made people want to compromise and want to come to some sort of understanding with one another. i think that we need more of that, in general u with the tea party. i think it just can't be done. those are people who came to washington saying we want to destroy it. and that's what they're there for. so it's very, very hard to get any kind of movement. >> is there a way to move this harry in a way back toward trying to put the people and human rights of people back as a priority rather than see the oba obstructionists just block everything? >> i think we're on that path and we should not be deterred or distracted by what the right wing does. but i just have to also make an observation that the work that the r.f.k. center does, in its work for instance in uganda, which is going to be pa rt of african policy right now in uganda, we're helping to support b
and that assad will be held accountable. u.s. officials are reporting that syria has ordered military chemical corps to be prepared. now syrian state television claims the country has no plans of using chemical weapons, no matter the circumstances. but the u.s. is worried that syrians are getting ready to put together a nerve gas mixture and that that could be used in artillery shells. the state department called any use of chemical weapons a hard red line and said they are continuing to monitor the situation. meanwhile, iran is claiming it's captured a u.s. drone flying over the persian gulf today. according to internationally-recognized limits, those drones must stay at least 12 nautical miles off the coast. but a u.s. defense official is telling cnn that the u.s. navy has fully accounted for all of its vehicles in the middle east. whatever iranians are claiming to have, it is not an actively operating drone. >> think progress is reporting that police can record video inside your home without a warrant. that ruling ca
, through new year's day. >> j. larry 3, new hampshire will become the first state in u.s. history to be represented in congress entirely by women. they just elected the second woman governor in its history. the women holding the top political offices gathered for a discussion in manchester, new hampshire. this is just over an hour. >> on to the program -- just a little bit on the way the questions were developed for today's event. this is a little bit of an atypical chamber event. questions were developed with input from the chamber's board of directors and the new hampshire women's initiative. there is centered not around issues but around this moment of history. the mission is to celebrate the first in the nation status that new hampshire has by holding this event today. rabin will facilitate a conversation about what this moment in time means to these five women. this power will go so fast. i am sure, and i hope, that this conversation leaves you hungry for more. please, share today with your friends, your children, your co-workers. we will have dvd's available. please share th
the house, but i remain proud of our bipartisan effort for which the u.s.a. today called us the brave 38. and i believe this type of thoughtful independent leadership that this is the type of leadership that the 10th district deserves. i also believe that the courage and leadership shown by the house to take on the difficult, but necessary position of reining entitlement spending deserves recognition. we know that medicare stands out as a primary driver of our debt in the future. and unfortunately, this future is not so far off. with one of medicare's key programs scheduled to go bankrupt in the next 10 to 12 years, sustaining the status quo means dramatic cuts down the road on the vulnerable americans who need the program the most, crippling increases to the debt and most likely both. instead, i believe we have a generational obligation to ensure that our children's potential is not crossed by a debt burden borne out of the inability to govern responsebly. medicare reform requires broad bipartisan support so we are not there yet. we are not. i do want to express my appreciation to democ
by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the u.s. house is in recess until 2:00 p.m. eastern today. about half an hour from now they'll start with one-minute speeches. when those are done the house will recess again, come back at 5:00 eastern. consider a motion to negotiate with the senate on a compromised defense authorization bill setting policy for the next year. recorded votes will take place at 6:30 p.m. eastern. you can see the house on c-span. the house hearing on the conflict in the democratic republic of congo. and rwanda's involvement in that country. u.n. security council experts alleged rwanda support of rebels against the congolese army after last month's cease of the city of gomea by a rebel military group. that hearing by house foreign affairs subcommittee will begin live at 3:00 p.m. eastern. you can see it on c-span3. also a look at the republican party in the 113th congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern ri
about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little b
who is there client. >> so far a few have been cold in europe and the u.s., and orders keep coming in even though there is skepticism on the streets. >> i think it's creepy. i don't like that idea at all. it seems a bit like big brother. >> it's weird. >> especially if i was shopping in the underwear section. >> and one retailer said it won't use it worried it might be an invasion of privacy. >> it's weird, like the movie where everybody is watching you. it's concerning. >> in this economy, the last thing stores want to do is scare people away. >> i think if you are doing things customers are not comfortable, i think you crossed the line. >> and some say it's a good idea. >> if you need them, you can ask where something is. >> and there are real people to ask them. >> and we are videotaped dozens times a day and we don't know it. >> one thing about the stores they have to post that they are video taeupg you, and once it's posted it could be a camera in the corner, or a mannequin. be careful. >>> it's bone chilling cold. >> and we are saying aus stau law sraesa stot snowstorm. comin
the u.s. house of representatives." do you look for the books when they come out by members of congress or politicians? >> guest: i mean, i certainly note them, but i feel as if, at least from my stand point, that the books are a way to entrench members of congress, not just in their positions, but, also, potentially, to position them for future runs be it within their current offices or maybe something different so it seems as if it's more of a calling card than it is furthering their career as authors. certainly, being authors of books is yet another feather in the cap of politicians so it's just a way of announcing to the larger public that they are part of the larger conversation. .. >> we paid attention to the mark rubio book when he was touted as the vice presidential candidate then we lost interest. he has a future in the republican party. it will come back. >> host: well known for members and officials have written books including colin powell, madeleine albright another book "prague winter" and the late senator arlen specter had a book out in april 2020 -- 2012 "life among the
of the president's permanent campaign and he's an associate political science professor at the u.s. naval academy and is here to talk about presidents and their campaigning and fundraising. welcome to the program. guest: thank you very much for having me. host: how has the campaigning and the fund raising change or altered the job of the president? guest: what i do in my research is i focus on the president's time. most look at money raised but time is the president's scarcest resource and over the last three and a half decades, the president has spent more and more time raising money and they've -- there are always more important things that the president can do than he has time to do. so more time fundraising means less time doing other things. host: who makes the decision on how much time the president is going to do the fund raising? somebody in the white house or there are people in the parties? caller: it's a combination of white house staff who are dedicated to thinking about elect trarl matters and outside staff. in guest: the decades ago, it was outsourced to the committee but ever since
there and to use these funds for increased security at u.s. embassies and other overseas posts identified in the department's security review after the benghazi attack making additional funds available for this purpose is one of the recommendations of the accountable -- accountability review board chaired by ambassador pickerring and admiral mullen. this amendment is a permissive amendment. it is not a prescriptive amendment. it permits the transfer of funds between the diplomatic program and embassy security, construction and maintenance at which would otherwise be precluded due to percentage limitations on such transfers. according to c.b.o., the amendment has no outlay scoring impact. we all want to do -- we all want to do what we can to prevent another tragedy like what occurred in benghazi. the state department has done a review and these funds will be used to expedite construction of marine security guard posts overseas posts to, build secure embassies in beirut, lebanon and zimbabwe. there is nothing controversial about this amendment. these are existing funds. there is no new appr
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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